Risk of Rain 2 surpasses 1M sales in one month

A complete and successful transformation. 

Risk of Rain developers at Hopoo Games have really knocked it out of the park. Risk of Rain 2 has already sold more than 1 million copies during the first month after launch and they really deserve it. The work they’ve clearly put into this new game shows how committed they were on delivering a truly improved experience.

The first thing to note if you haven’t ever heard of Risk of Rain is that this new title has made the leap from 2D rogue-like platformer to a fully three-dimensional, open world experience. The transformation has been complete and fans of the first game couldn’t be happier.

Risk of Rain

Risk of Rain 2 has some identifiable ingredients from formulas that have worked well before: the co-op, open-world exploration and hoard fighting of games like Minecraft and maybe Fortnite’s Save the World; as well as rogue-like, permadeath-driven narrative. In Risk of Rain 2 players will again explore an unforgiving planet filled with random areas, enemies and bosses to defeat. The goal is to find a way out of this uncharted world safely. But dying is something pretty common in this title, so expect to restart your progress a few times.

The RPG elements from the first Risk of Rain are present as well, with collecting loot and unlocking new gear keeps being a major part of the experience. And remember, this is an experience you can play solo or with friends, joining efforts to progress in the game and finally find an exit from this perilous world.

Risk of Rain 2

It’s really amazing how Hopoo Games has been able to completely transform Risk of Rain into a completely immersive experience in a 3D world what we’d seen in the first game. No wonder they’ve amassed more than 1 million sales in just around 30 days. Few indie titles are able to see this amount of success and exposure to their creations, and the more examples we find that defy this logic, the happier we get. Because it means that the only thing that truly separates an independent game from a triple-A is money, not creativity nor talent.

Associate Editor

Our boy from Buenos Aires, Juan has been a gamer for as long as he can remember (and possibly even longer than that). He loves a good story, and believes every indie game has a compelling one to tell.

Juan Manuel Fontan

Associate Editor Our boy from Buenos Aires, Juan has been a gamer for as long as he can remember (and possibly even longer than that). He loves a good story, and believes every indie game has a compelling one to tell.