Mondo Museum will be the first simulation game of its kind

Now your computer can house more than just your browser history.

It’s odd that no one has ever made a museum simulator, especially when there are games on the market such as Airport Simulator and Blockchain Tycoon. Mondo Museum aims to change that by offering you the chance to ‘design and curate the world’s greatest museum.’

Styled in the fashion of classic sim titles, such as Theme Hospital, Mondo Museum will give you an opportunity to fill exhibit halls with the wonders of the world from the pharaohs of ancient Egypt to the dinosaurs of the Cretaceous period. It’s not only the museum’s artefacts you’ll have to consider though, like every good sim there’s also the spinning plates of staff and financing to consider. It aims to be as authentic as possible.

Mondo Museum

It seems like it could be great fun, I mean who hasn’t dreamed of having a five-story art complex displaying 500 variations on that one picture of Michael Cera? If nothing else, that’s at least a good idea for a mod. It has plenty more to offer though than my own interpretations of artistic importance. You can customise everything from the wallpaper to the windows placing significant value on the combination of exhibits to create an effect on visitors. Something often overlooked but vitally important to the impact of a museum’s displays.

That could be as simple as grouping Viking artefacts together to effectively tell a story or as complex as curating fine art, there’s certainly a level of finesse involved with the later. One of the benefits of this being a game is that you’ll be able to get hold of some of the rarer pieces of human history, as it’s often the case that museums don’t share some of their unique acquisitions. But, here, you could easily have Neil Armstrong’s spacesuit sitting next to Tutankhamun’s death mask. It’s an inviting opportunity for creativity.

Mondo Museum will be launching into Early Access on Steam 2020.

Editor

Jon loves the experimental nature of indie games, and has written about them for the likes of Eurogamer, PCGamer and GameReactor. As editor of The Indie Game Website, Jon is responsible for the overall content direction of the website, and enjoys moving things around in our Google Calendar.

Jon Calvin

Editor Jon loves the experimental nature of indie games, and has written about them for the likes of Eurogamer, PCGamer and GameReactor. As editor of The Indie Game Website, Jon is responsible for the overall content direction of the website, and enjoys moving things around in our Google Calendar.