Disc Creatures captures the nostalgia of classic Pokemon

Gotta Snatch ‘Em All.Disc Creatures

Pokemon Sword and Sheild might only be around the corner but classic Pokemon fans need look no further than Disc Creatures – a tribute to classic monster-catching RPGs from the golden days of portable gaming.

Created by a solo Japanese developer, Disc Creatures shows us a world in which monsters and humans co-exist. Much like Pokemon and Dragon Quest Monsters, each creature has its own distinct personality and traits. These include a range of abilities they can use in battles against other monsters in the world. DiscKid, a technology invented to copy creatures, allows humans to adopt them and use their powers to help others and solve the mysteries of the world.

The fact you’re capturing digital copies of the creatures is an interesting take and subverts any of the ethical concerns parents might have had about children playing a game in which animals are essentially encouraged to fight. Despite these slight changes, it captures the colour gameboy-era RPG feel in every way with chirpy 8-bit music and cute visuals.

Most importantly, there are 200 collectable creatures in the game each with their own unique moveset to use in the 3v3 battles. It’s worth noting that creatures can’t evolve though, which is another key difference from the original Pokemon games. The solo developer under the name ‘PICORINNE SOFT’ had this to say about the origins of the game.

“When I was a kid, I was really into games that had a lot of unique monsters. Monster-themed games came out one after another, and among these titles, a variety of interesting monsters were born. I was influenced by this and used to show off the monsters I thought up and drew on the edge of my notebook to my friends. Disc Creatures is a game I’ve made without forgetting the monsters that were born on the edge of that notebook.”

Disc Creatures is out now on Steam.

Editor

Jon loves the experimental nature of indie games, and has written about them for the likes of Eurogamer, PCGamer and GameReactor. As editor of The Indie Game Website, Jon is responsible for the overall content direction of the website, and enjoys moving things around in our Google Calendar.

Jon Calvin

Editor Jon loves the experimental nature of indie games, and has written about them for the likes of Eurogamer, PCGamer and GameReactor. As editor of The Indie Game Website, Jon is responsible for the overall content direction of the website, and enjoys moving things around in our Google Calendar.