Why You Should Start No Man’s Sky

In a word? Egg.

I’m not going to assume you know what No Man’s Sky is, it could well be that, much like the aliens you find in the game, you were off-planet when it launched. I’m then going to assume you also somehow missed both its fall from grace, and also it’s phoenix-like rebirth into one of the biggest comeback stories in gaming history. So, No Man’s Sky launched back in 2016, it was hyped up to impossible levels, and as a result, launched to a rather mixed reception.

I actually quite liked the original version, it was almost meditative in its simplicity and the first awe-inspiring moment where you burst through the atmosphere of a planet to be rewarded by your first glimpse of the endless void of space is still etched into my memory. Journeying from place to place with no real goal in mind is dull for some, but it came at a time when that’s what I wanted to be doing. Despite that, I probably wouldn’t have recommended it to anyone at the time, if only because nobody asked. Yes, I realise nobody is asking now, but also you can’t stop me recommending it now, so you have to deal with it.

Anyway, four years later, No Man’s Sky is recognisable, but it looks like the nerdy one from school who got hot several years later. Like, damn No Man’s Sky, you been working out? How much can you bench now? You know, that sort of ageing process that most people would sacrifice a toe for. Not only does it now have multiplayer, VR, a far better missions structure, proper crafting, a better economic system, more customisation, and a much wider array of flora and fauna, but you can now get Void Eggs, which eventually become living ships. That, my friends, is cool beyond reason, and that alone is why I think you should play it. There’s also all the other stuff like a nigh-infinite universe to explore, alien languages to learn, and the chill lo-fi feel of many of the planets, but it’s mostly just the Void Eggs.

 

Jason is the Editor of The Indie Game Website. He’s a lover of roguelikes, soulslikes, and other kinds of likes. He basically spends a lot of time getting beaten up in games and seems to enjoy it.

Jason Coles

Jason is the Editor of The Indie Game Website. He's a lover of roguelikes, soulslikes, and other kinds of likes. He basically spends a lot of time getting beaten up in games and seems to enjoy it.