Wandersong isn’t on the up-and-up, according to Steam’s algorithm

Steam appears to be confused by Wandersong’s impeccable goodness. 

What happens when a game is so well-received that a series of bots think it’s fake?

You have a small chuckle to yourself and sit down to play the indie musical adventure Wandering, of course. In a strange turn of events, it appears that the game has been limited due to Steam’s algorithm, because it’s “still learning.” Essentially, that means the system of bots isn’t quite sure if it’s legit or not.

So, months after Wandersong debuted on the platform, you still can’t get trading cards from the game or even Achievements despite the fact that it’s so universally liked. The “Steam is learning about this game” message has been staid on the page for months. It’s been there as early as September. According to developer Greg Lobanov, the issue is based on the fact that Steam’s approval process is based on algorithms, and “most games” have this same flag removed when they launch.

Unfortunately, the game’s reviews are so “suspiciously good,” according to Lobanov, that the label was never removed.

“Statistically speaking, our game doesn’t exist and everyone who likes it is an account we hacked.”

Out of the 200+ Steam reviews, only a handful are negative at this time, so you can see how the platform might be a bit confused. It’s all a bit silly, but also a little funny at the same time. The idea that Wandersong is too good to be real will likely have fans chuckling, while Lobanov has to be having a good laugh about this all to himself.

Contributor

Brittany has been covering games and tech for over a decade for the likes of G4, Popular Science, IGN, Empire, Kotaku, Rolling Stone and GameSpot – as well as appearing as a speaker at video game conventions such as PAX East. When she’s not writing or gaming, she’s looking for the next great visual novel.

Brittany Vincent

Contributor Brittany has been covering games and tech for over a decade for the likes of G4, Popular Science, IGN, Empire, Kotaku, Rolling Stone and GameSpot - as well as appearing as a speaker at video game conventions such as PAX East. When she's not writing or gaming, she's looking for the next great visual novel.