Cultist Simulator sells over 100,000 copies

The cult is growing ever larger. 

Cultist Simulator review

Cultist Simulator, the bizarre little game that finds you building yourself up from humble beginnings into the head of an occult organization, has been doing extremely well for itself. Indie studio Weather Factory took to its official blog to announce one very important milestone the game had sold in its first year: 105,000. Nothing to sneeze at!

Producer Lottie Bevan and Failbetter’s Alexis Kennedy spoke at length on how the game has fared since it first debuted, and on its sales. It sold most of its copies on Steam, equaling 85,200 copies and the others on Humble, GOG, and itch.io. That’s a lot of cultists learning the trade out there. They also distributed around half a million copies via Humble Monthly, which didn’t net them royalties, but it did get the game into people’s hands. It turns out this move helped to double sales when the Humble Monthly promotion hit, and how.

Weather Factory have made an intriguing game that, while not for everyone, does have plenty of reasons to jump on board. You may start with absolutely nothing, working your way up to getting a job as a copywriter or some other mundane profession, but you could end up going face to face with the Elder Gods. Life moves fast in Cultist Simulator. There’s a lot going on in the game, and it’s definitely worth checking out, especially as it’s sold this many copies. Give it a try – the cult followers won’t bite. Probably.

Contributor

Brittany has been covering games and tech for over a decade for the likes of G4, Popular Science, IGN, Empire, Kotaku, Rolling Stone and GameSpot – as well as appearing as a speaker at video game conventions such as PAX East. When she’s not writing or gaming, she’s looking for the next great visual novel.

Brittany Vincent

Contributor Brittany has been covering games and tech for over a decade for the likes of G4, Popular Science, IGN, Empire, Kotaku, Rolling Stone and GameSpot - as well as appearing as a speaker at video game conventions such as PAX East. When she's not writing or gaming, she's looking for the next great visual novel.