Disjunction paints a murky cyberpunk portrait

Sprite stealth joins murderous intent in this dystopian adventure.  The cyperpunk genre is expanding just about every time we take a few minutes to explore it, and one of the latest additions is Disjunction, a stealth action game with an excellent art style and intriguing gameplay mechanics. Disjunction, Ape Tribe Games’ first release, looks a […]

Sprite stealth joins murderous intent in this dystopian adventure. 

The cyperpunk genre is expanding just about every time we take a few minutes to explore it, and one of the latest additions is Disjunction, a stealth action game with an excellent art style and intriguing gameplay mechanics.

Disjunction, Ape Tribe Games’ first release, looks a lot like a top-down adventure like Hotline Miami with its violence and control, but borrows a bit of classics like Deus Ex for good measure. Obviously it won’t be a huge contender for titles like Cyberpunk 2077 when they come around the corner, but it looks like a surprising indie effort that we can’t wait to get our hands on.

The game will weave three stories together from different protagonists’ varied points of view, include 30 non-linear levels, a “reactive story” where your actions will have “real consequences,” pixel art, as well as special abilities, cybernetic upgrades, and talents to customize to your liking.

The single-player title is placed in 20148, where the world is basically a dystopia riddled with environmental problems, natural resource starvation, and a ridiculous urban sprawl after people had been forced to flee to the cities to live. There’s crime and lawlessness, and, well, a completely new New York City.

There’s currently no concrete release date for Disjunction, but you can check it out along with some additional screens and add it to your wishlist via Steam now while you patiently wait for its release later this year.

Contributor

Brittany has been covering games and tech for over a decade for the likes of G4, Popular Science, IGN, Empire, Kotaku, Rolling Stone and GameSpot – as well as appearing as a speaker at video game conventions such as PAX East. When she’s not writing or gaming, she’s looking for the next great visual novel.

Brittany Vincent

Contributor Brittany has been covering games and tech for over a decade for the likes of G4, Popular Science, IGN, Empire, Kotaku, Rolling Stone and GameSpot - as well as appearing as a speaker at video game conventions such as PAX East. When she's not writing or gaming, she's looking for the next great visual novel.