Escape A Curse In Hazel Sky This Year

A dark and beautiful world

There’s nothing quite like an emotive video game. The feeling you get when delving into new, undiscovered worlds, where every turn reveals something new, and every drop hides something worth discovering. It’s just not something that passive forms of media can do quite as well. Sure, you’re along for the ride in a film or book, but you’re not in control of the car. It’s the main thing that makes games like the newly announced Hazel Sky so intriguing.

Hazel Sky is set in a world divided, one where the sciences and the arts never mix. As such, artists and engineers no longer talk, but things aren’t going well as a result. You play as Shane, a young man trying to find his place in this world, he’s an incredibly adept engineer, but there appears to be something he can’t solve haunting his family. It’s an intriguing enough concept, but what really helps sell it, at least in the trailer, is the gorgeous art style. It looks almost like a claymation film, with an odd sheen to everything around this deeply mysterious setting, and with beautiful vistas and strange machines everywhere, just waiting to be found.

It’s not just adventuring, puzzles, and exposition though, oh no. There’s even a guitar-playing sequence, or possibly even a full mini-game of some sort, which one can only hope will eventually lead to the Wonderwall gag we all deserve and secretly love/hate the idea of — what a time to be alive.

Jason is the Editor of The Indie Game Website. He’s a lover of roguelikes, soulslikes, and other kinds of likes. He basically spends a lot of time getting beaten up in games and seems to enjoy it.

Jason Coles

Jason is the Editor of The Indie Game Website. He's a lover of roguelikes, soulslikes, and other kinds of likes. He basically spends a lot of time getting beaten up in games and seems to enjoy it.